Geography

OUR AIMS FOR GEOGRAPHY

 

At St Paul’s we believe that Geography helps to provoke and provide answer to questions about the natural and human aspects of the world. Our children are encouraged to develop a greater understanding and knowledge of the world, as well as have the opportunities to put their skills to the test through experiential learning. Our progressive geography curriculum enables children to develop knowledge and skills that are transferable to other curriculum areas. We seek to inspire the children to be curious about the world and its people which will remain with them for the rest of their lives; to promote the children’s interest and understand diverse places, people, resources and natural and human environments.


Geography at St Paul’s is taught through our topics (linked to Cornerstones) throughout the year, so that children can achieve depth in their learning. Our hierarchies identify the key knowledge and skills of each topic and consideration has been given to ensure progression across topics throughout each year group across the school.

 

Our children will have the opportunities to gain:

  • An excellent knowledge of where places are and what they are like- human and physical.
  • An excellent understanding of the ways in which places are interdependent and interconnected and how much human and physical environments are interrelated.
  • An extensive base of geographical knowledge and vocabulary.
  • Fluency in complex, geographical enquiry and the ability to apply questioning skills and use effective analytical and presentational techniques.
  • The ability to reach clear conclusions and develop a reasoned argument to explain findings.
  • Significant levels of originality, imagination or creativity as shown in interpretations and representations of the subject matter.
  • Highly developed and frequently utilised fieldwork and other geographical skills and techniques.
  • A passion for and commitment to the subject, and a real sense of curiosity to find out about the world and the people who live there.
  • The ability to express well-balanced opinions, rooted in very good knowledge and understanding about current and contemporary issues in society and the environment.

 

THE NATIONAL CURRICULUM

 

The National Curriculum for Geography aims to ensure that all pupils:

  • develop contextual knowledge of the location of globally significant places – both terrestrial and marine – including their defining physical and human characteristics and how these provide a geographical context for understanding the actions of processes
  • understand the processes that give rise to key physical and human geographical features of the world, how these are interdependent and how they bring about spatial variation and change over time
  • are competent in the geographical skills needed to:
  • collect, analyse and communicate with a range of data gathered through experiences of fieldwork that deepen their understanding of geographical processes
  • interpret a range of sources of geographical information, including maps, diagrams, globes, aerial photographs and Geographical Information Systems (GIS)
  • communicate geographical information in a variety of ways, including through maps, numerical and quantitative skills and writing at length

 

GEOGRAPHY ACROSS THE KEY STAGES

 

EYFS 

Through Understanding of the World the children will:

  • Comment and ask questions about aspects of their familiar world, such as the place where the live or the natural world,
  • Talk about some of the things they have observed, such as plants, animals, natural and found objects,
  • Talk about why things happen and how things work
  • Develop an understanding of growth, decay and changes over time,
  • Show care and concern for living things and the environment,
  • Look closely at similarities, differences, patterns and change,
  • Talk about past and present events in their own lives and in the lives of family members,
  • Know about similarities and differences between themselves and other, and among families, communities and traditions,
  • Know about similarities and differences in relation to places, objects, materials and living things,
  • Talk about the features of their immediate environment and how environments might vary from one another.

 

KEY STAGE 1

Locational Knowledge –

  • Name and locate the world’s 7 continents and 5 oceans
  • Name, locate and identify characteristics of the four countries and capital cities of the United Kingdom and its surrounding seas

Place Knowledge –

  • Explore geographical similarities and differences through studying the human and physical geography of a local area and a contrasting non- European country

Human and Physical Geography-

  • Learn about seasonal and daily weather patterns in the United Kingdom and the location of hot and cold areas of the world in relation to the Equator and the North and South Poles
  • Use basic geographical vocabulary to refer to physical and human features

 

Geographical Skills and Fieldwork-

  • Use a range of maps, globes, atlases and aerial photographs
  • Use basic geographical vocabulary
  • Learn how a map is used and begin to recognise simple features
  • Design their own maps
  • Follow routines on a map
  • Begin to use 4 points on a compass (North, East, South and West)
  • Ask simple geographical, ‘where?’, ‘what?’, and ‘who?’ questions about the world and their environment eg ‘What is it like to live in this place?’

 

LOWER KEY STAGE 2

Locational Knowledge –

  • Begin to locate the world’s countries using maps
  • Learn about counties and cities in the United Kingdom
  • Find out about the equator, longitude and latitude

Place Knowledge –

  • Explore geographical similarities and difference through the study of human and physical geography for regions of the United Kingdom, European countries and America

 

Human and Physical Geography-

-       Describe and understand key aspects of:

  • physical geography, including: rivers, mountains, volcanoes and earthquakes, and the water cycle
  • human geography, including: types of settlement and land use

 

Geographical Skills and Fieldwork-

  • Use a wider range of maps and globes (including digital)
  • Use appropriate geographical vocabulary
  • Use maps of different scales
  • Recognise patterns on maps
  • Label maps to show different features
  • Begin to use 8 points on a compass (North, North-East, East, South-East, South, South-West West and North-West)
  • Begin to use four figure grid references and coordinates
  • Ask more searching questions including, ‘how?’ and, ‘why? as well as, ‘where?’ and ‘what?’ when investigating places and processes

 

UPPER KEY STAGE 2

Locational Knowledge –

  • Become more confident in locating the world’s countries,
  • Name and locate counties and cities of the United Kingdom
  • Use their understanding of latitude, longitude and the Equator to find the Norther and Southern Hemispheres, the Tropics of Cancer and Capricorn, Arctic and Antarctic Circle, the Prime/Greenwich Meridian and time zones (including day and night)

 

Place Knowledge –

  • Explore geographical similarities and difference through the study of human and physical geography for regions around the world

 

Human and Physical Geography-

-       Describe and understand key aspects of:

  • physical geography, including: climate zones, biomes and vegetation belts
  • human geography, including: economic activity including trade links, and the distribution of natural resources including energy, food, minerals and water

 

Geographical Skills and Fieldwork-

  • Use a wider range of maps and globes (including digital) and choose which is most appropriate based on what they are using it for
  • Use appropriate geographical vocabulary
  • Use maps of different scales
  • Recognise patterns on maps
  • Begin to recognise more complex features of a map such as contours and slopes
  • Confidently use the 8 cardinal points on a compass
  • Confidently use six figure grid references and coordinates
  • Ask and answer questions that are more causal eg Why is that happening in that place? Could it happen here? What happened in the past to cause that? How is it likely change in the future?

 

ANNUAL PLAN

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