History

OUR AIMS FOR HISTORY 

At St Paul’s, we aim to provide our children with a high quality history education that will help them gain a coherent knowledge and understanding of Britain’s past and that of the wider world. We aim to inspire children’s’ curiosity to know more about the past by reflecting on their own memories as well as through learning about historical events and people outside of their living memory.  We will teach the children a sense of chronology, and through this they will develop a sense of identity and a cultural understanding based on their historical heritage and will learn to value their own and other people’s cultures in modern multicultural Britain. By considering how people lived in the past, they are better able to make their own life choices today.


History at St Paul’s is taught through our topics (linked to Cornerstones) throughout the year, so that children can achieve depth in their learning. Our hierarchies identify the key knowledge and skills of each topic and consideration has been given to ensure progression across topics throughout each year group across the school.

 

Our children will have the opportunities to gain:

  • An excellent knowledge and understanding of people, places, events and contexts from a range of historical periods, concepts and processes. 
  • The ability to think critically about history and communicate ideas confidently in styles appropriate to a range of audiences. 
  • The ability to consistently support, evaluate and challenge their own ideas and others’ views using detailed, appropriate and accurate historical evidence derived from a range of sources. 
  • A respect for historical evidence and the ability to make robust and critical use of it to support their explanations and judgements when making comparisons with life today. 
  • A desire to embrace challenging activities, including opportunities to undertake high-quality research across a range of history topics, using a variety of resources. 
  • The ability to think, reflect, debate, discuss and evaluate the past, formulating and refining questions and lines of enquiry. 
  • A passion for history and an enthusiastic engagement in learning, which develops their sense of curiosity about the past and their understanding of how and why people interpret the past in different ways.

 

THE NATIONAL CURRICULUM

The National Curriculum for History aims to ensure that all pupils:

  • know and understand the history of these islands as a coherent, chronological narrative, from the earliest times to the present day: how people’s lives have shaped this nation and how Britain has influenced and been influenced by the wider world
  • know and understand significant aspects of the history of the wider world: the nature of ancient civilisations; the expansion and dissolution of empires; characteristic features of past non-European societies; achievements and follies of mankind
  • gain and deploy a historically grounded understanding of abstract terms such as ‘empire’, ‘civilisation’, ‘parliament’ and ‘peasantry’
  • understand historical concepts such as continuity and change, cause and consequence, similarity, difference and significance, and use them to make connections, draw contrasts, analyse trends, frame historically valid questions and create their own structured accounts, including written narratives and analyses
  • understand the methods of historical enquiry, including how evidence is used rigorously to make historical claims, and discern how and why contrasting arguments and interpretations of the past have been constructed
  • gain historical perspective by placing their growing knowledge into different contexts: understanding the connections between local, regional, national and international history; between cultural, economic, military, political, religious and social history; and between short- and long-term timescales

 

HISTORY ACROSS THE KEY STAGES

 

EYFS

Through Understanding of the World the children will:

  • Show interest in the lives of people who are familiar to them.
  • Remember and talk about significant events in their own
  • Recognise and describe special times or events for family or friends.
  • Show interest in different occupations and ways of life.
  • Know some of the things that make them unique, and to talk about some of the similarities and differences in relation to friends or family.
  • Comment and ask questions about aspects of their familiar world, such as the place where they live or the natural world.
  • Talk about some of the things they have observed, such as plants, animals, natural and found objects.
  • Talk about why things happen and how things work.
  • Develop an understanding of growth, decay and changes over time.
  • Look closely at similarities, differences, patterns and change.
  • Talk about past and present events in their own lives and in the lives of family members.
  • Know about similarities and differences between themselves and others, and among families, communities and traditions.
  • Know about similarities and differences in relation to places, objects, materials and living things.
  • Talk about the features of their own immediate environment and how environments might vary from one another. 

 

KEY STAGE 1

The children will learn about: changes within living memory, events beyond living memory that are significant nationally or globally, the lives of significant individuals in the past who have contributed to national and international achievements, comparing aspects of life in different periods and finding out about significant historical events, people and places in their own locality

-       Show their emerging knowledge and understanding of the past by:

  • Recognising the distinction between past and present
  • Identifying some similarities and differences between their present and aspects of the past · Place a few events and objects in order by using common phrases to show the passing of time (old, new/young, days and months)

 

  • Tell the difference between past and present in their own and other people's lives 
  • Begin to understand the reasons why people in the past acted as they did from a range of sources 
  • Ask and answer questions about the past through observation and handling a range of sources, such as, objects, pictures, people talking about their past, buildings, written sources 
  • Show what they know and understand about the past in different ways (speaking, role play, drawing and writing).  
  • Understand historical concepts and use them to make simple connections and draw contrasts 

 

LOWER KEY STAGE

The children will learn about: The Roman Empire and its impact on Britain, Britain’s settlement by Anglo-Saxons and Scots, the achievements of the earliest civilizations and Ancient Greece, changes in Britain from the Stone Age to the Iron Age, the Viking and Anglo-Saxon struggle for the Kingdom of England to the time of Edward the Confessor, a local history study and a non-European society that provides contrasts with British history.

 

-       Show their increasing knowledge and understanding of the past by:

  • Using specialist dates and terms and by placing topics studied into different periods (century, decade, Roman, Egyptian, BC, AD…)
  • Making some links between and across periods

 

-       Be able to describe some of the main events, people and periods they have studied by:

  • Understanding some of the ways in which people's lives have shaped this nation
  • Describing how Britain has influenced and been influenced by the wider word Identify some of the different ways in which the past can be represented, and that different versions of the past may exist (artist's pictures, museum displays, written sources)

 

  • Understand some of the methods of historical enquiry, and how evidence is used sources to make detailed observations, finding answers to questions about the past. 
  • Use some sources to start devising historically valid questions about change, cause, similarity and difference and significance. 
  • Construct informed responses that involve thoughtful selection and organisation of relevant historical information using appropriate vocabulary.

 

UPPER KEY STAGE 2

The children will learn about: An aspect or theme in British history that extends pupils’ chronological knowledge beyond 1066, a local history study, the achievements of the earliest civilizations – an overview of where and when the first civilizations appeared and a depth study of Ancient Egypt, a non-European society that provides contrasts with British history (Mayan civilization)

 

-       Chronologically secure knowledge by:

  • Sequencing events and periods through the use of appropriate terms relating to the passing of time (empire, civilisation, parliament, peasantry…)
  • Identifying where periods studied fit into a chronological framework by noting connections, trends and contrasts over time
  • Know and understand the history of these islands as coherent, chronological narrative, from the earliest times to the present day

 

-       Show their knowledge and understanding of local, national and international history by:

  • Understanding significant aspects of history- nature of ancient civilisations; expansion and dissolution of empires; characteristic features of non-European societies; achievements and follies of mankind
  • Gaining historical perspective by placing their growing knowledge into different contexts…between cultural, economic, military, political religious and social history
  • Establishing a narrative showing connections and trends within and across periods of study

 

  • Understand how our knowledge of the past is constructed from a range of different sources and that different versions of past events may exist, giving some reasons for this
  • Understand the methods of historical enquiry, how evidence is used to make historical claims, and begin to discern how and why contrasting arguments and interpretations of the past have been constructed.
  • Use sources as a basis for research from which they will begin to use information as evidence to test hypotheses.
  • Produce structured work that makes connections, draws contrasts, analyses trends, frame historically-valid questions involving thoughtful section and organisation of relevant historical information using appropriate dates and terms ad contrasts over time.

 

ANNUAL PLAN

Please click the document below: